Learn English Vocabulary: Understand Popular Christmas Carols

Once Thanksgiving is over and the holiday season officially begins, it’s difficult to avoid Christmas carols piping through the speakers of public spaces all over the United States. As a native English speaker, I admittedly sang these songs for years without actually understanding what they meant; many contain idioms and old English terms that are not commonly used in conversational English. This post explains the meaning of four popular Christmas carols.

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Slang: How Invented Words Become Part of Our Language

If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. If you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different. If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, (excluding Brazil, Guyana, French Guyana and Suriname) each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, only forty-five minutes from the border of Argentina, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. However, if you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different. If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, (excluding Brazil, Guyana, French Guyana and Suriname) each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, only forty-five minutes from the border of Argentina, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. However, if you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different. If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, (excluding Brazil, Guyana, French Guyana and Suriname) each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, only forty-five minutes from the border of Argentina, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. However, if you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different.

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False Friends: Nobody Likes Them But We Have to Learn Them

It’s nice to have a true friend, someone who shares similar interests as you, is there for you when you need someone to talk to and someone who understands you. True friends are great. False friends, however, are not so great; they’re confusing and you can’t trust them and sometimes they don’t mean what they say. False friends occur between two people but did you know that false friends also exist in languages? False friends are two words that look similar, and sound similar, but actually have different meanings. False friends can occur between many different languages and there are a plethora of false friends between English and other languages, especially the Latin based languages.

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How to Listen Better in English – a Few Useful Tips

You feel like you’re making progress in learning English. You can understand your teacher when she gives you a lesson on grammar now. Three months ago, you could only comprehend one out of every ten words she said. Congratulate yourself! Then you sit down to watch a news video online, and at least half of the story’s content does not make any sense. You want to get better at listening, but how?

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Meet Stephan Käsermann: Master Mechanic and Cool Guy

Stephan Käsermann is one of a kind here at Bridge. He is always the center of everything fun. During class breaks, other students flock to him to hear his jokes or hear about his shenanigans over the weekend. His boisterous laugh is contagious and identifiable, filling the halls with humor and happiness. He is the student everyone wants to know and standing at an impressive six feet four inches, his presence is undeniable.

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Meet Aldi Sorel: Veteran Student at BridgeEnglish Denver

Aldi Sorel is someone to admire. He came from the Gabonese Republic, which is a sovereign state on the west coast of Central Africa, to be with his mother who had already been here for ten years. He has been at BridgeEnglish Denver longer than most of the teachers and he is for sure the veteran student here having been at Bridge since 2010. He came to the U.S. with practically no English skills whatsoever and was thrown into the Denver public school system before he could even communicate with anyone. He now speaks fluent French (his native tongue) as well as fluent English and this November, after two years of studying hard at Bridge, he plans to move on and go to university to start his career as a computer engineer.

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Who Stole the Money? A Brief Lesson in English Intonation

I didn’t say he stole the money.
I didn’t say he stole the money.
I didn’t say he stole the money.
I didn’t say he stole the money.
I didn’t say he stole the money.
I didn’t say he stole the money.
Which one of these sentences means “I think someone else stole the money?” Not sure? OK. Which sentence implies that I merely suggested that he stole the money? Still don’t know?

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Where Are They Now? Interview with Mohammed Murgharbel

English students come to BridgeEnglish Denver from all over the world, and one of the largest student populations hails from Saudi Arabia. Many of these students enter our academic education program to prepare for college. They learn skills to earn high scores on the IELTS exam, which is necessary to enter many universities in the U.S. and around the world. They also learn how to read and understand college-level texts in English and write essays in English.

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Idioms: They’re Sexy and You Know It.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

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How to Disagree in English and Make Friends in the Process

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

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