Meet Carly Block: Took The Road Less Traveled, But Loves It!

Carly Block sort of stumbled into the world of English as a Second Language (ESL) by accident. It was never her plan to be a teacher, let alone an ESL teacher. But then a spontaneous trip to China with her father and sister introduced her to the very distinct world of ESL teachers and their lifestyle. Never having even heard of ESL, she was intrigued and sought out work teaching English in China. Little did she know that that particular experience would completely change her life path.

Continue reading


How to Listen Better in English – a Few Useful Tips

You feel like you’re making progress in learning English. You can understand your teacher when she gives you a lesson on grammar now. Three months ago, you could only comprehend one out of every ten words she said. Congratulate yourself! Then you sit down to watch a news video online, and at least half of the story’s content does not make any sense. You want to get better at listening, but how?

Continue reading


Meet Stephan Käsermann: Master Mechanic and Cool Guy

Stephan Käsermann is one of a kind here at Bridge. He is always the center of everything fun. During class breaks, other students flock to him to hear his jokes or hear about his shenanigans over the weekend. His boisterous laugh is contagious and identifiable, filling the halls with humor and happiness. He is the student everyone wants to know and standing at an impressive six feet four inches, his presence is undeniable.

Continue reading


Meet Aldi Sorel: Veteran Student at BridgeEnglish Denver

Aldi Sorel is someone to admire. He came from the Gabonese Republic, which is a sovereign state on the west coast of Central Africa, to be with his mother who had already been here for ten years. He has been at BridgeEnglish Denver longer than most of the teachers and he is for sure the veteran student here having been at Bridge since 2010. He came to the U.S. with practically no English skills whatsoever and was thrown into the Denver public school system before he could even communicate with anyone. He now speaks fluent French (his native tongue) as well as fluent English and this November, after two years of studying hard at Bridge, he plans to move on and go to university to start his career as a computer engineer.

Continue reading


The Four Stages of Culture Shock You May Experience While Studying at BridgeEnglish Denver

Most people think they aren’t going to experience culture shock when they move to another country. “That isn’t going to happen to me,” they might say. “It’s going to be amazing every day I am there.”

That is exactly what I thought when I moved to South America for two years. I thought that I was different, stronger or something, until one day it hit me like a ton of bricks. Coming to a new country is a challenge. It is exciting and new and scary and you don’t know exactly what to expect. Is it going to be that much different from my home country? Will I be able to adjust? So many questions go through your head even before you actually arrive in your host country. Everyone experiences culture shock differently and BridgeEnglish Denver students, whether they are here for only two weeks or for a year, must adapt to their new culture. It isn’t always that easy.

Continue reading


Idioms: They’re Sexy and You Know It.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

Continue reading


How to Disagree in English and Make Friends in the Process

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

Continue reading


Meet Anastasia Andriienko, Student at BridgeEnglish Denver

Looking back at the blog and all of the interviews I have done, I noticed something unusual. There are hardly any interviews with the female students at BridgeEnglish Denver. So, I decided to find one of our female students who has been here for a while and delve deeper into her motivation for coming to America, specifically Bridge, and for studying English. Her name is Anastasia Andriienko and she comes from the far away land of Ukraine and is our only Ukrainian student, at least since I have been here since last year. She came with almost no English except the alphabet and has moved up three levels since her arrival in January.

Continue reading


Meet Abbas Hassani, BridgeEnglish Student and Future Nobel Prize Winner

Remember that person in high school who was friends with everyone and always had something fun or exciting going on, the person who always knew where the parties were and what everyone was doing that weekend? At BridgeEnglish Denver, that person is definitely Abbas Hassani.

Abbas is without a doubt the “social director” of the school. If you want to know which bar everyone is going to on Friday night or which activities everyone is doing on Saturday, you’d better ask Abbas because he will be there, and, what’s more, he wants you to be there.

Continue reading


Meet Justin Wahe: Head English Teacher and Gentle Giant

When Justin Wahe came to work at BridgeEnglish Denver, the term “gentle giant” came to my mind. He is, after all, six feet five, a towering foot and two inches taller than my short five foot three inch frame and by far the tallest person at the school.

While some very tall men can have an intimidating effect on people, Justin, on the other hand, has the most pleasant disposition, nicest smile and greatest attitude around. When I am having a bad day, he always seems to cheer me up. Justin would seriously do anything for we teachers here at BridgeEnglish Denver, not to mention being committed to giving the best education to the students as possible.

Continue reading