Should I Take Group or Private English Classes?

You know you want to study English in the U.S., but should you take group or private classes? One offers lots of interaction with other students, potentially from around the world, but the other offers the chance for very tailored study and accelerated language learning. Here’s what to consider when choosing whether group or private English classes are right for you.

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Transforming Lives – Mission Accomplished: Meet Andressa Da Silva

Andressa Da Silva came to us from Brazil in an unusual way, selected in a special competition organized through the American consulate, the American Chamber of Commerce and Bridge. She is currently in the ninth week of her ten-week program and is making the most out of every single moment of this experience. Andressa has a positive attitude, magnetic personality and an amazing aptitude for learning English. I feel so lucky to have met this tremendous young woman and will be so sad to see her go. I invite you to learn more about her unique story below.

Amy: Tell me how you learned about Bridge.

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BridgeEnglish Denver and Chadron State College Announce Early Start Program

BridgePathways, the academic arm of BridgeEnglish Denver, is collaborating with Chadron State College (CSC) to provide students enrolled in Bridge’s Academic English Program with the opportunity to be concurrently enrolled in CSC credit courses being delivered at our language center in Denver, Colorado. By doing so, you can get an “Early Start” toward completing your degree while you improve your English language proficiency at Bridge.

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Slang: How Invented Words Become Part of Our Language

If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. If you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different. If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, (excluding Brazil, Guyana, French Guyana and Suriname) each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, only forty-five minutes from the border of Argentina, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. However, if you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different. If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, (excluding Brazil, Guyana, French Guyana and Suriname) each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, only forty-five minutes from the border of Argentina, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. However, if you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different. If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, (excluding Brazil, Guyana, French Guyana and Suriname) each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, only forty-five minutes from the border of Argentina, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. However, if you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different.

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A Little Latina Spice Makes Learning English So Nice: Meet Mayinett Rodes

Mayinett Rodes is one spicy Latina woman. She is from Mexico and her personality and character are as spicy as the food. She says what’s on her mind, loves spicy food and can dance like only a true Mexican woman can. She was one of BridgeEnglish Denver’s executive students in the new Business English course until mid-October. Mayi, as she likes to be called, decided to take a much-needed vacation from her stressful job as a financial advisor in Veracruz, Mexico, and come to the United States to study English. We were glad she chose Bridge because she added a lot of charisma and well, spice (for lack of a better word), to the classes and atmosphere here at BridgeEnglish. She lends a unique perspective on what it is like to be a female in a male oriented business world.

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False Friends: Nobody Likes Them But We Have to Learn Them

It’s nice to have a true friend, someone who shares similar interests as you, is there for you when you need someone to talk to and someone who understands you. True friends are great. False friends, however, are not so great; they’re confusing and you can’t trust them and sometimes they don’t mean what they say. False friends occur between two people but did you know that false friends also exist in languages? False friends are two words that look similar, and sound similar, but actually have different meanings. False friends can occur between many different languages and there are a plethora of false friends between English and other languages, especially the Latin based languages.

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How to Listen Better in English – a Few Useful Tips

You feel like you’re making progress in learning English. You can understand your teacher when she gives you a lesson on grammar now. Three months ago, you could only comprehend one out of every ten words she said. Congratulate yourself! Then you sit down to watch a news video online, and at least half of the story’s content does not make any sense. You want to get better at listening, but how?

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Where Do They Come From? The Origins of Four Popular English Idioms

Sometimes when I am in class teaching a grammar point or vocabulary, or just having a class discussion, I find myself using idioms or expressions that are common to me but obviously not to a non-native ESL learner. As I notice the confused looks on my students’ faces I suddenly realize that the expression that I so nonchalantly just forced upon them has to be explained. But the strange phenomenon about English idioms is that most native English speakers have no idea what their actual origin is.

Sometimes when I am in class teaching a grammar point or vocabulary, or just having a class discussion, I find myself using idioms or expressions that are common to me but obviously not to a non-native ESL learner. As I notice the confused looks on my students’ faces I suddenly realize that the expression that I so nonchalantly just forced upon them has to be explained. But the strange phenomenon about English idioms is that most native English speakers have no idea what their actual origin is.

Sometimes when I am in class teaching a grammar point or vocabulary, or just having a class discussion, I find myself using idioms or expressions that are common to me but obviously not to a non-native ESL learner. As I notice the confused looks on my students’ faces I suddenly realize that the expression that I so nonchalantly just forced upon them has to be explained. But the strange phenomenon about English idioms is that most native English speakers have no idea what their actual origin is.

Sometimes when I am in class teaching a grammar point or vocabulary, or just having a class discussion, I find myself using idioms or expressions that are common to me but obviously not to a non-native ESL learner. As I notice the confused looks on my students’ faces I suddenly realize that the expression that I so nonchalantly just forced upon them has to be explained. But the strange phenomenon about English idioms is that most native English speakers have no idea what their actual origin is.

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Meet Adriana Arias: Diplomat and Former Executive Student at BridgeEnglish Denver

Adriana Arias was an executive student at BridgeEnglish Denver for two months in the Spring of 2012. Having a job in international relations for the government in Colombia, it is extremely important for her to be able to speak English fluently because a large part of her job is communicating with people from all over the world, in English. Adriana was a pleasure to have in class. Full of Latina fire, she expressed her opinions freely and with conviction, and outside of class she was equally fun, joining both students and teachers in social events and trips around Colorado. Her stay here was short but her impact on fellow students and teachers will endure. She has since been back to work in Bogotá and continues to study English and speak it whenever she can.

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Meet Stephan Käsermann: Master Mechanic and Cool Guy

Stephan Käsermann is one of a kind here at Bridge. He is always the center of everything fun. During class breaks, other students flock to him to hear his jokes or hear about his shenanigans over the weekend. His boisterous laugh is contagious and identifiable, filling the halls with humor and happiness. He is the student everyone wants to know and standing at an impressive six feet four inches, his presence is undeniable.

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