Slang: How Invented Words Become Part of Our Language

If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. If you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different. If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, (excluding Brazil, Guyana, French Guyana and Suriname) each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, only forty-five minutes from the border of Argentina, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. However, if you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different. If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, (excluding Brazil, Guyana, French Guyana and Suriname) each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, only forty-five minutes from the border of Argentina, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. However, if you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different. If there is one thing I learned during my two-year adventure in South America, it is that even though most of South American countries speak Spanish, (excluding Brazil, Guyana, French Guyana and Suriname) each country has its own slang. I lived in Chile, only forty-five minutes from the border of Argentina, yet right across the border into Argentina, the slang is completely different. I thought that was an interesting phenomenon since, in the US, most slang is widespread from state to state. However, if you compare the US with the UK or Australia or South Africa, the slang of those countries is also completely different.

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False Friends: Nobody Likes Them But We Have to Learn Them

It’s nice to have a true friend, someone who shares similar interests as you, is there for you when you need someone to talk to and someone who understands you. True friends are great. False friends, however, are not so great; they’re confusing and you can’t trust them and sometimes they don’t mean what they say. False friends occur between two people but did you know that false friends also exist in languages? False friends are two words that look similar, and sound similar, but actually have different meanings. False friends can occur between many different languages and there are a plethora of false friends between English and other languages, especially the Latin based languages.

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Where Do They Come From? The Origins of Four Popular English Idioms

Sometimes when I am in class teaching a grammar point or vocabulary, or just having a class discussion, I find myself using idioms or expressions that are common to me but obviously not to a non-native ESL learner. As I notice the confused looks on my students’ faces I suddenly realize that the expression that I so nonchalantly just forced upon them has to be explained. But the strange phenomenon about English idioms is that most native English speakers have no idea what their actual origin is.

Sometimes when I am in class teaching a grammar point or vocabulary, or just having a class discussion, I find myself using idioms or expressions that are common to me but obviously not to a non-native ESL learner. As I notice the confused looks on my students’ faces I suddenly realize that the expression that I so nonchalantly just forced upon them has to be explained. But the strange phenomenon about English idioms is that most native English speakers have no idea what their actual origin is.

Sometimes when I am in class teaching a grammar point or vocabulary, or just having a class discussion, I find myself using idioms or expressions that are common to me but obviously not to a non-native ESL learner. As I notice the confused looks on my students’ faces I suddenly realize that the expression that I so nonchalantly just forced upon them has to be explained. But the strange phenomenon about English idioms is that most native English speakers have no idea what their actual origin is.

Sometimes when I am in class teaching a grammar point or vocabulary, or just having a class discussion, I find myself using idioms or expressions that are common to me but obviously not to a non-native ESL learner. As I notice the confused looks on my students’ faces I suddenly realize that the expression that I so nonchalantly just forced upon them has to be explained. But the strange phenomenon about English idioms is that most native English speakers have no idea what their actual origin is.

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Who Stole the Money? A Brief Lesson in English Intonation

I didn’t say he stole the money.
I didn’t say he stole the money.
I didn’t say he stole the money.
I didn’t say he stole the money.
I didn’t say he stole the money.
I didn’t say he stole the money.
Which one of these sentences means “I think someone else stole the money?” Not sure? OK. Which sentence implies that I merely suggested that he stole the money? Still don’t know?

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Dangerous Liaisons: How to Speak English Without Sounding Like a Robot

Dangerous Liaisons. No, I am not talking about the 1988 Glenn Close and John Malkovich movie about gossiping 17th century aristocrats. I am talking about the English pronunciation phenomenon of an otherwise absent consonant sound at the end of the first of two consecutive words, the second of which begins with a vowel sound and follows without pause. Or, to put it more plainly, how native English speakers connect their words when speaking, making listening comprehension for ESL students the most difficult of the receptive skills.

You see, English isn’t spoken as it is written, therefore when spoken naturally and at full speed it bears little resemblance to the written version of the same sentence. For this reason, liaisons are an essential part of learning how to speak English and just as importantly, a part of understanding English.

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Idioms: They’re Sexy and You Know It.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

Why learn idioms? Think of some common idioms in your language and about how important they are to communication. They are powerful ways to convey your meaning.

Experienced BridgeEnglish Denver teacher, Robyn Jacobs, says that using idioms and phrasal verbs show the meaning of your words in English in a very strong way. Thus, if you can use idioms correctly, you will sound fluent, confident and knowledgable. Sexy, in other words.

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How to Disagree in English and Make Friends in the Process

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

Discussions in which you have a different opinion than your companions happen all the time, including at school and work. Learning how to disagree politely in English will help you keep your friends and make new ones.

Which of the following statements do you think is more respectful?

A.) I am afraid that I disagree with you. B.) You are so wrong.

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Get Smarter: Learning English Has Hidden Advantages.

Everyone that comes to BridgeEnglish Denver is focused on one thing, learning how to speak or improve their English. Some students come with some acquisition of the language already under their belts while others come as total beginners. Either way, their goals are the same: to become bilingual by adding English to their already fluent native tongue. Most of the benefits of being bilingual are quite obvious – more job and education opportunities, cultural and communication advantages, and more rewarding travel opportunities.
Everyone that comes to BridgeEnglish Denver is focused on one thing, learning how to speak or improve their English. Some students come to BridgeEnglish Denver with some acquisition of the language already under their belts while others come as total beginners. Either way, their goals are the same: to become bilingual by adding English to their already fluent native tongue.

Most of the benefits of being bilingual are quite obvious – more job and education opportunities, cultural and communication advantages, and more rewarding travel opportunities.
Everyone that comes to BridgeEnglish Denver is focused on one thing, learning how to speak or improve their English. Some students come to BridgeEnglish Denver with some acquisition of the language already under their belts while others come as total beginners. Either way, their goals are the same: to become bilingual by adding English to their already fluent native tongue.

Most of the benefits of being bilingual are quite obvious – more job and education opportunities, cultural and communication advantages, and more rewarding travel opportunities.
Everyone that comes to BridgeEnglish Denver is focused on one thing, learning how to speak or improve their English. Some students come to BridgeEnglish Denver with some acquisition of the language already under their belts while others come as total beginners. Either way, their goals are the same: to become bilingual by adding English to their already fluent native tongue.

Most of the benefits of being bilingual are quite obvious – more job and education opportunities, cultural and communication advantages, and more rewarding travel opportunities.

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Teacher, I Want to Learn British English. That’s Problematic Student.

England and America are two countries separated by a common language according to the famous phrase of Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw. Warm beer versus cold beer, cricket versus baseball.

Sometimes, it certainly seems that way when teaching at BridgeEnglish Denver. As a native of the old country, I am often asked by students which spelling version of a certain word is correct. Is it color or colour (cue Microsoft red line telling me I spelled the word wrongly)? Should I use the word lift or elevator? Is it soccer or football?

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