The Community College Advantage – Options for Attending University in the US

This article has been updated in September 2013 to ensure accuracy.

If you would like to study at a university in the United States, you should thoroughly research all of your options before making a decision. Unfortunately, many students limit their search to big-name, four-year institutions assuming they are the only path to success. This simply is not the case, and no search would be complete without first considering the community college option. To better understand their value, you first need to understand the American university system.

Let’s say your goal is to become an industrial engineer. Before you will ever take a class related to engineering, you will likely be required to take classes for your general requirements or core curriculum. These university classes typically occupy your first two years and are related to reading, writing, speech, the sciences, mathematics, logic, etc. And guess what? You will likely be taking these classes with future dentists, doctors, economists, business people, etc. That’s right—you all take the same classes for the first two years regardless of your future career!

Community colleges in the US often provide 2-year associate’s degree programs, which include all the basic classes in the core curriculum at major universities. After you finish your associate’s degree, you can transfer those credits to a major university where you will finally begin taking classes related to your chosen career. Some of the benefits of community colleges are…

  • They are frequently less expensive (commonly ¼ the cost or less per credit!)
  • Better student-to-teacher ratios, which means you get more attention
  • Located in most American cities giving you more options
  • Many partner with major universities for easy transfer of credits
  • Professors focus more on students and less on their own research projects

At this point, you might be asking yourself “Why do I need to go to Harvard to learn basic academic skills?” The short answer is that you do not. Like all wise investments, the value of your education should be determined by its potential for return. Before you pay more, make sure that you are in fact getting more from a four-year institution. In the end, a community college may be a wiser choice for you.

If you’d like to study at university in the USA, Bridge can help with their University Admission Consultation. Contact an Academic Counselor today!attend a university in the USIf you would like to further your education in the United States, you should thoroughly research all of your options before making a decision. Unfortunately, many students limit their search to big-name, four-year institutions assuming they are the only path to success. This simply is not the case, and no search would be complete without first considering the community college option. To better understand their value, you first need to understand the American university system.

Let’s say your goal is to become an industrial engineer. Before you will ever take a class related to engineering, you will likely be required to take classes for your general requirements or core curriculum. These classes typically occupy your first two years and are related to reading, writing, speech, the sciences, mathematics, logic, etc. And guess what? You will likely be taking these classes with future dentists, doctors, economists, business people, etc. That’s right—you all take the same classes for the first two years regardless of your future career!attend a university in the USIf you would like to further your education in the United States, you should thoroughly research all of your options before making a decision. Unfortunately, many students limit their search to big-name, four-year institutions assuming they are the only path to success. This simply is not the case, and no search would be complete without first considering the community college option. To better understand their value, you first need to understand the American university system.

Let’s say your goal is to become an industrial engineer. Before you will ever take a class related to engineering, you will likely be required to take classes for your general requirements or core curriculum. These classes typically occupy your first two years and are related to reading, writing, speech, the sciences, mathematics, logic, etc. And guess what? You will likely be taking these classes with future dentists, doctors, economists, business people, etc. That’s right—you all take the same classes for the first two years regardless of your future career!attend a university in the USIf you would like to further your education in the United States, you should thoroughly research all of your options before making a decision. Unfortunately, many students limit their search to big-name, four-year institutions assuming they are the only path to success. This simply is not the case, and no search would be complete without first considering the community college option. To better understand their value, you first need to understand the American university system.

Let’s say your goal is to become an industrial engineer. Before you will ever take a class related to engineering, you will likely be required to take classes for your general requirements or core curriculum. These classes typically occupy your first two years and are related to reading, writing, speech, the sciences, mathematics, logic, etc. And guess what? You will likely be taking these classes with future dentists, doctors, economists, business people, etc. That’s right—you all take the same classes for the first two years regardless of your future career!

Community colleges often provide 2-year associate’s degree programs, which include all the basic classes in the core curriculum at major universities. After you finish your associate’s degree, you can transfer those credits to a major university where you will finally begin taking classes related to your chosen career. Some of the benefits of community colleges are…

  • They are frequently less expensive (commonly ¼ the cost or less per credit!)
  • Better student-to-teacher ratios, which means you get more attention
  • Located in most American cities giving you more options
  • Many partner with major universities for easy transfer of credits
  • Professors focus more on students and less on their own research projects

At this point, you might be asking yourself “Why do I need to go to Harvard to learn basic academic skills?” The short answer is that you do not. Like all wise investments, the value of your education should be determined by its potential for return. Before you pay more, make sure that you are in fact getting more from a four-year institution. In the end, a community college may be a wiser choice for you.

Community colleges often provide 2-year associate’s degree programs, which include all the basic classes in the core curriculum at major universities. After you finish your associate’s degree, you can transfer those credits to a major university where you will finally begin taking classes related to your chosen career. Some of the benefits of community colleges are…

  • They are frequently less expensive (commonly ¼ the cost or less per credit!)
  • Better student-to-teacher ratios, which means you get more attention
  • Located in most American cities giving you more options
  • Many partner with major universities for easy transfer of credits
  • Professors focus more on students and less on their own research projects

At this point, you might be asking yourself “Why do I need to go to Harvard to learn basic academic skills?” The short answer is that you do not. Like all wise investments, the value of your education should be determined by its potential for return. Before you pay more, make sure that you are in fact getting more from a four-year institution. In the end, a community college may be a wiser choice for you.

Community colleges often provide 2-year associate’s degree programs, which include all the basic classes in the core curriculum at major universities. After you finish your associate’s degree, you can transfer those credits to a major university where you will finally begin taking classes related to your chosen career. Some of the benefits of community colleges are…

  • They are frequently less expensive (commonly ¼ the cost or less per credit!)
  • Better student-to-teacher ratios, which means you get more attention
  • Located in most American cities giving you more options
  • Many partner with major universities for easy transfer of credits
  • Professors focus more on students and less on their own research projects

At this point, you might be asking yourself “Why do I need to go to Harvard to learn basic academic skills?” The short answer is that you do not. Like all wise investments, the value of your education should be determined by its potential for return. Before you pay more, make sure that you are in fact getting more from a four-year institution. In the end, a community college may be a wiser choice for you.

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