Why Study English in Denver? For the Weather, Of Course!

Many native Coloradans say that if you want to live in a state with all four seasons, then Colorado is hands down the best state to live in. I couldn’t agree more. I personally think, aside from not having an ocean, Colorado is the greatest place to live in the United States, which makes it even better that BridgeEnglish is located in the heart of Denver.

When I first started working at Bridge, I have to admit, I found it a bit odd that students from all over the world would want to come study English in Denver, not because Denver isn’t great, but when you think about a foreigner coming to the states for the first time you assume that they would want to go to New York or Miami or Los Angeles; one of the bigger more popular states that are known throughout the entire world.

After having interviewed many students and asking them the same question; “Why did you choose Bridge in Denver?” I often times get the same answer. They tell me that even though there are bigger cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, Denver didn’t seem to be as daunting to someone coming to America for the first time. They tell me that the thought of going to New York to live and study for a spell is quite intimidating.

Another answer they give, which is quite admirable, is that they have come here to study and learn and being in a city like New York would cause way too many distractions. Whatever the reason the students have chosen to come to Colorado, they chose correctly, for many great reasons. I personally think that one of the greatest aspects of this state is hands down the weather.

Sunshine, sunshine, sunshine. Colorado has an average of 300 hundred days of sunshine per year.  The climate here in Denver is also quite dry, like a desert. The average humidity is a comfortable 40 percent, which means that when the temperatures go to extremes either in the winter or the summer, it doesn’t feel as extreme compared to other states because of the low humidity. If anyone has ever experienced a humid cold like in the Midwest or the East coast, you know that the humidity makes the cold “bone-chilling,” as if the cold moisture in the air is actually penetrating your body right down to your bones.

The summer months here can get very hot. In fact, 2012 was the hottest summer ever on record. But hopefully that will not become the norm for the future. In summers past, the hottest month is usually July with temperatures sometimes rising to over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. But the great thing about Colorado is that there is a monsoon season every summer. When most people think of monsoon they think of torrential downpours in jungle climates, however, the monsoons in Colorado mean that almost every day in July, usually in the height of the afternoon, the clouds roll in and burst open to cool the state with a very short rain shower.

That said, when should you come to Bridge for your English studies? If you are a student who has never seen snow then the winter months are a great time to come. Seeing the students’ faces the first time they see snow always makes me smile. In fact, at Bridge you will receive a special certificate documenting the first time you have ever seen snow. You can even build a snowman outside of the Bridge building or make “snow angels” if you really want the full experience. If you enjoy heat and a plethora of outdoor sports, concerts and festivals, then summer is a good time to come. Whatever your climate preference, we are glad you have chosen to come to Bridge in Denver, Colorado and we hope you thoroughly enjoy your stay here.

Many native Coloradoans say that if you want to live in a state with all four seasons, then Colorado is hands down the best state to live in. I couldn’t agree more. I personally think, aside from not having an ocean, Colorado is the greatest place to live in the United States, which makes it even better that BridgeEnglish is located in the heart of Denver. When I first started working at Bridge, I have to admit, I found it a bit odd that students from all over the world would want to come study English in Denver, not because Denver isn’t great, but when you think about a foreigner coming to the states for the first time you assume that they would want to go to New York or Miami or Los Angeles; one of the bigger more popular states that is known throughout the entire world. After having interviewed many students and asking them the same question; “Why did you choose Bridge in Denver,” I often times get the same answer. They tell me that even though there are bigger cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, Denver didn’t seem to be as daunting to someone coming to America for the first time. They tell me that the thought of going to New York to live and study for a spell is quite intimidating. Another answer they give, which is quite admirable, is that they have come here to study and learn and being in a city like New York would cause way too many distractions. Whatever the reason the students have chosen to come to Colorado, they chose correctly, for many great reasons. I personally think that one of the greatest aspects of this state is hands down the weather.

Sunshine, sunshine, sunshine. Colorado has an average of 300 hundred days of sunshine per year. Sometimes that surprises people. When students think of Colorado, often times they think of snow and the mountains. When it snows the sky is grey, however, snow falls at night too. One delight about this state is that you can go to bed after a normal, precipitation-free day and then wake up the next day to a white, yet sunny, winter wonderland. The snow has fallen only during the night to blanket the ground with white, fluffy snow and present you with a bright, sunny day to boot. What is better than that? While it is true that the temperatures can get frigid here sometimes, I think most people can agree that a frigid day with sun is better than one without. Ever been to Seattle? If you have, then you will understand my point.

Since Colorado is part of the Great America Desert (a term used in the 19th century to describe the western part of the Great Plains east of the Rocky Mountains), the climate here in Denver is quite dry, like a desert. The average humidity here is a comfortable 40 percent, which means that when the temperatures go to extremes either in the winter or the summer, it doesn’t feel as extreme compared to other states because of the low humidity. If anyone has ever experienced a humid cold like in the Midwest or the East coast, you know that the humidity makes the cold “bone-chilling,” as if the cold moisture in the air is actually penetrating your body right down to your bones. I can attest that a 30-degree day in Austin, Texas for example feels much colder than a 35-degree day in Colorado. The same is true for higher temperatures. Many of Bridge students come from South America where the humidity in the summer months makes being outside almost intolerable. You are sticky and sweaty all day and even being outside for a brief moment is comparable to being in a steam room. So when these students come to Denver, they are pleasantly surprised that they can actually be outside and not immediately become drenched with the moisture in the air. The low humidity makes Colorado pretty comfortable all year long. However, dry climate means dry skin and lips, so be sure to bring or buy lots of lotion and lip balm. If you are not used to a dry climate, it will feel very different to your body.

The summer months here can get very hot. In fact, last summer, 2012, was the hottest summer ever on record. But hopefully that will not become the norm for the future. In summers past, the hottest month is usually July with temperatures sometimes rising to over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. But the great thing about Colorado is that there is a monsoon season every summer. When most people think of monsoon they think of torrential downpours in jungle climates, however, the monsoons in Colorado mean that almost every day in July, usually in the height of the afternoon, the clouds roll in and burst open to cool the state with a very short rain shower. The showers usually last about twenty minutes; just long enough to produce the wonderful, sweet smell of rain in the atmosphere and to cool you off for a bit. Most of the time the showers are also accompanied by beautiful lightening shows and ominous sounds of thunder. Colorado is one of the only places I have ever been to that actually has thunder and lightening when there is rain. Thunder and lightening just make the rain so much more enjoyable. I love sitting on my balcony and watching the free light-spectacular while listening to the calming, therapeutic sound of the rain all around me, even if for only twenty minutes.

That said, when should you come to Bridge for your English studies? If you are a student who has never seen snow then the winter months are a great time to come. Seeing the students’ faces the first time they see snow always makes me smile. In fact, at Bridge you will receive a special certificate documenting the first time you have ever seen snow. You can even build a snowman outside of the Bridge building or make “snow angels” if you really want the full experience. If you enjoy heat and a plethora of outdoor sports, concerts and festivals, then summer is a good time to come. Whatever your climate preference, we are glad you have chosen to come to Bridge in Denver, Colorado and we hope you thoroughly enjoy your stay here.

Many native Coloradoans say that if you want to live in a state with all four seasons, then Colorado is hands down the best state to live in. I couldn’t agree more. I personally think, aside from not having an ocean, Colorado is the greatest place to live in the United States, which makes it even better that BridgeEnglish is located in the heart of Denver. When I first started working at Bridge, I have to admit, I found it a bit odd that students from all over the world would want to come study English in Denver, not because Denver isn’t great, but when you think about a foreigner coming to the states for the first time you assume that they would want to go to New York or Miami or Los Angeles; one of the bigger more popular states that is known throughout the entire world. After having interviewed many students and asking them the same question; “Why did you choose Bridge in Denver,” I often times get the same answer. They tell me that even though there are bigger cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, Denver didn’t seem to be as daunting to someone coming to America for the first time. They tell me that the thought of going to New York to live and study for a spell is quite intimidating. Another answer they give, which is quite admirable, is that they have come here to study and learn and being in a city like New York would cause way too many distractions. Whatever the reason the students have chosen to come to Colorado, they chose correctly, for many great reasons. I personally think that one of the greatest aspects of this state is hands down the weather.

Sunshine, sunshine, sunshine. Colorado has an average of 300 hundred days of sunshine per year. Sometimes that surprises people. When students think of Colorado, often times they think of snow and the mountains. When it snows the sky is grey, however, snow falls at night too. One delight about this state is that you can go to bed after a normal, precipitation-free day and then wake up the next day to a white, yet sunny, winter wonderland. The snow has fallen only during the night to blanket the ground with white, fluffy snow and present you with a bright, sunny day to boot. What is better than that? While it is true that the temperatures can get frigid here sometimes, I think most people can agree that a frigid day with sun is better than one without. Ever been to Seattle? If you have, then you will understand my point.

Since Colorado is part of the Great America Desert (a term used in the 19th century to describe the western part of the Great Plains east of the Rocky Mountains), the climate here in Denver is quite dry, like a desert. The average humidity here is a comfortable 40 percent, which means that when the temperatures go to extremes either in the winter or the summer, it doesn’t feel as extreme compared to other states because of the low humidity. If anyone has ever experienced a humid cold like in the Midwest or the East coast, you know that the humidity makes the cold “bone-chilling,” as if the cold moisture in the air is actually penetrating your body right down to your bones. I can attest that a 30-degree day in Austin, Texas for example feels much colder than a 35-degree day in Colorado. The same is true for higher temperatures. Many of Bridge students come from South America where the humidity in the summer months makes being outside almost intolerable. You are sticky and sweaty all day and even being outside for a brief moment is comparable to being in a steam room. So when these students come to Denver, they are pleasantly surprised that they can actually be outside and not immediately become drenched with the moisture in the air. The low humidity makes Colorado pretty comfortable all year long. However, dry climate means dry skin and lips, so be sure to bring or buy lots of lotion and lip balm. If you are not used to a dry climate, it will feel very different to your body.

The summer months here can get very hot. In fact, last summer, 2012, was the hottest summer ever on record. But hopefully that will not become the norm for the future. In summers past, the hottest month is usually July with temperatures sometimes rising to over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. But the great thing about Colorado is that there is a monsoon season every summer. When most people think of monsoon they think of torrential downpours in jungle climates, however, the monsoons in Colorado mean that almost every day in July, usually in the height of the afternoon, the clouds roll in and burst open to cool the state with a very short rain shower. The showers usually last about twenty minutes; just long enough to produce the wonderful, sweet smell of rain in the atmosphere and to cool you off for a bit. Most of the time the showers are also accompanied by beautiful lightening shows and ominous sounds of thunder. Colorado is one of the only places I have ever been to that actually has thunder and lightening when there is rain. Thunder and lightening just make the rain so much more enjoyable. I love sitting on my balcony and watching the free light-spectacular while listening to the calming, therapeutic sound of the rain all around me, even if for only twenty minutes.

That said, when should you come to Bridge for your English studies? If you are a student who has never seen snow then the winter months are a great time to come. Seeing the students’ faces the first time they see snow always makes me smile. In fact, at Bridge you will receive a special certificate documenting the first time you have ever seen snow. You can even build a snowman outside of the Bridge building or make “snow angels” if you really want the full experience. If you enjoy heat and a plethora of outdoor sports, concerts and festivals, then summer is a good time to come. Whatever your climate preference, we are glad you have chosen to come to Bridge in Denver, Colorado and we hope you thoroughly enjoy your stay here.

Many native Coloradoans say that if you want to live in a state with all four seasons, then Colorado is hands down the best state to live in. I couldn’t agree more. I personally think, aside from not having an ocean, Colorado is the greatest place to live in the United States, which makes it even better that BridgeEnglish is located in the heart of Denver. When I first started working at Bridge, I have to admit, I found it a bit odd that students from all over the world would want to come study English in Denver, not because Denver isn’t great, but when you think about a foreigner coming to the states for the first time you assume that they would want to go to New York or Miami or Los Angeles; one of the bigger more popular states that is known throughout the entire world. After having interviewed many students and asking them the same question; “Why did you choose Bridge in Denver,” I often times get the same answer. They tell me that even though there are bigger cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, Denver didn’t seem to be as daunting to someone coming to America for the first time. They tell me that the thought of going to New York to live and study for a spell is quite intimidating. Another answer they give, which is quite admirable, is that they have come here to study and learn and being in a city like New York would cause way too many distractions. Whatever the reason the students have chosen to come to Colorado, they chose correctly, for many great reasons. I personally think that one of the greatest aspects of this state is hands down the weather.

Sunshine, sunshine, sunshine. Colorado has an average of 300 hundred days of sunshine per year. Sometimes that surprises people. When students think of Colorado, often times they think of snow and the mountains. When it snows the sky is grey, however, snow falls at night too. One delight about this state is that you can go to bed after a normal, precipitation-free day and then wake up the next day to a white, yet sunny, winter wonderland. The snow has fallen only during the night to blanket the ground with white, fluffy snow and present you with a bright, sunny day to boot. What is better than that? While it is true that the temperatures can get frigid here sometimes, I think most people can agree that a frigid day with sun is better than one without. Ever been to Seattle? If you have, then you will understand my point.

Since Colorado is part of the Great America Desert (a term used in the 19th century to describe the western part of the Great Plains east of the Rocky Mountains), the climate here in Denver is quite dry, like a desert. The average humidity here is a comfortable 40 percent, which means that when the temperatures go to extremes either in the winter or the summer, it doesn’t feel as extreme compared to other states because of the low humidity. If anyone has ever experienced a humid cold like in the Midwest or the East coast, you know that the humidity makes the cold “bone-chilling,” as if the cold moisture in the air is actually penetrating your body right down to your bones. I can attest that a 30-degree day in Austin, Texas for example feels much colder than a 35-degree day in Colorado. The same is true for higher temperatures. Many of Bridge students come from South America where the humidity in the summer months makes being outside almost intolerable. You are sticky and sweaty all day and even being outside for a brief moment is comparable to being in a steam room. So when these students come to Denver, they are pleasantly surprised that they can actually be outside and not immediately become drenched with the moisture in the air. The low humidity makes Colorado pretty comfortable all year long. However, dry climate means dry skin and lips, so be sure to bring or buy lots of lotion and lip balm. If you are not used to a dry climate, it will feel very different to your body.

The summer months here can get very hot. In fact, last summer, 2012, was the hottest summer ever on record. But hopefully that will not become the norm for the future. In summers past, the hottest month is usually July with temperatures sometimes rising to over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. But the great thing about Colorado is that there is a monsoon season every summer. When most people think of monsoon they think of torrential downpours in jungle climates, however, the monsoons in Colorado mean that almost every day in July, usually in the height of the afternoon, the clouds roll in and burst open to cool the state with a very short rain shower. The showers usually last about twenty minutes; just long enough to produce the wonderful, sweet smell of rain in the atmosphere and to cool you off for a bit. Most of the time the showers are also accompanied by beautiful lightening shows and ominous sounds of thunder. Colorado is one of the only places I have ever been to that actually has thunder and lightening when there is rain. Thunder and lightening just make the rain so much more enjoyable. I love sitting on my balcony and watching the free light-spectacular while listening to the calming, therapeutic sound of the rain all around me, even if for only twenty minutes.

That said, when should you come to Bridge for your English studies? If you are a student who has never seen snow then the winter months are a great time to come. Seeing the students’ faces the first time they see snow always makes me smile. In fact, at Bridge you will receive a special certificate documenting the first time you have ever seen snow. You can even build a snowman outside of the Bridge building or make “snow angels” if you really want the full experience. If you enjoy heat and a plethora of outdoor sports, concerts and festivals, then summer is a good time to come. Whatever your climate preference, we are glad you have chosen to come to Bridge in Denver, Colorado and we hope you thoroughly enjoy your stay here.

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